Real Consumer Spending Falls in July

Personal Income rose 0.2 percent in July after rising 0.5 percent in June. Wages and salaries, the largest component of personal income, rose 0.2 percent in July after rising 0.4 percent in June. PCE stat

Current-dollar disposable personal income (DPI), after-tax income rose 0.1 percent in July after rising 0.5 percent in June.

Real DPI, income adjusted for taxes and inflation, increased 0.1 percent in July after increasing 0.3 percent in June.

Real consumer spending, spending adjusted for price changes, decreased 0.2 percent in July after increasing 0.2 percent in June. Spending on durable goods decreased 0.6 percent in July after increasing 0.5 percent in June.

PCE prices increased 0.1 percent in July after increasing 0.2 percent in June. Excluding food and energy, PCE prices increased 0.1 percent in July, the same as in June.

Personal saving
Personal saving as a percent of DPI was 5.7 percent in July and 5.4 percent in June.

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Real Disposable Personal Income and Real Consumer Spending

GDP Up in Second Quarter

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased 4.2 percent in the second quarter of 2014, according to the “second” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the first quarter, real GDP decreased 2.1 percent. The second-quarter growth rate was revised up 0.2 percentage point from the “advance” estimate released in July.

Second-quarter highlights

The upturn in real GDP growth was primarily driven by the following: Q2Q Growth

  •  Exports, mainly goods exports, increased after decreasing in the first quarter.
  •  Nonfarm inventory investment by motor vehicle dealers turned up.
  •  Consumer spending, notably motor vehicles and parts, increased more than in the first quarter.

In addition, business investment picked up, and state and local government spending increased after decreasing in the first quarter.

In contrast to these contributions, imports (a subtraction in the calculation of GDP) were higher in the second quarter than in the first quarter.

Revisions

The 0.2 percentage point revision to second-quarter GDP growth primarily reflected an upward revision to business investment and a downward revision to imports. These revisions were partly offset by a downward revision to inventory investment.

See the Technical Note for more information.

Corporate profitsq2q corporate

BEA’s featured measure of corporate profits increased 8.0 percent at a quarterly rate in the second quarter after decreasing 9.4 percent in the first quarter. The second-quarter increase was the largest since the third quarter of 2010.

  • Profits of nonfinancial corporations rose 10.6 percent after falling 7.4 percent in the first quarter.
  • Profits of financial corporations rose 7.3 percent after falling 17.1 percent.
  • Profits from the rest of the world rose 1.2 percent after falling 6.1 percent.

Over the last 12 months, corporate profits fell 0.3 percent.

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New Statistics on the Activities of U.S. Multinational Enterprises are Now Available

The Bureau of Economic Analysis has released preliminary 2012 statistics on the outward activities of multinational enterprises (AMNEs). Outward AMNE statistics cover the worldwide activities of U.S. multinational enterprises (MNEs). These statistics provide information on the finance and operations of U.S. MNEs, including balance sheet and income statement details, employment and employee compensation, sales, value added, capital expenditures, trade in goods, and expenditures for research and development (R&D). The statistics can be used to measure the scale of the global business activity of U.S. MNEs as well as their impact on the U.S. economy and foreign host economies.

The worldwide operations of a U.S. MNE can be divided between its domestic operations, represented by the U.S. parent company, and its foreign operations, represented by foreign affiliates. Statistics for foreign affiliates are presented for two categories—all affiliates, which are at least 10 percent owned by their U.S. parents, and majority-owned foreign affiliates (MOFAs), which are more than 50 percent owned by their U.S. parents.

Highlights of the new data include:

  • The value added of U.S. MNEs rose 2.0 percent to $4,667.0 billion in 2012 after rising 9.2 percent in 2011. The increase reflected a 2.7 percent increase in the value added of U.S. parents and a 0.3 percent increase in the value added of their MOFAs.
  • Employment by U.S. MNEs increased 1.1 percent to 35.2 million workers in 2012 after increasing 2.2 percent in 2011. The increase reflected a 0.5 percent increase in the employment of U.S. parents and a 2.2 percent increase in the employment of MOFAs. U.S. parents accounted for one-fifth of the total U.S. private industry employment in 2012.
  • U.S. MNE capital expenditures rose 12.2 percent in 2012, reflecting growth for both U.S. parents (10.7 percent) and MOFAs (16.4 percent).
  • U.S. MNE R&D expenditures rose 3.6 percent in 2012, reflecting growth for U.S. parents (4.4 percent) and a slight decline for MOFAs (–0.2 percent).
  • Fifteen countries—the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Australia, Japan, France, China, Brazil, Mexico, Singapore, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Norway, and Italy—accounted for more than two-thirds of value added by MOFAs in 2012.

The newly released statistics also include revised 2011 statistics on the outward activities of multinational enterprises.

BEA also produces inward AMNE statistics that cover U.S. affiliates of foreign MNEs; these statistics will be released later this year.

Starting with the release of the 2012 preliminary and 2011 revised statistics, BEA has adopted the use of standard international terminology in BEA’s international economic accounts by replacing the term “multinational companies” with “multinational enterprises” and the term “financial and operating (F&O)” statistics with “activities of multinational enterprises (AMNE).” This change in terminology reflects BEA’s effort to conform more closely with international guidelines and does not affect the actual statistics produced.