Archive for the 'Regional' Category



Local Area Personal Income: Metropolitan Areas, 2001–2012

Personal income growth slowed in 2012 in most of the nation’s 381 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Personal income growth slowed in 311 MSAs, accelerated in 65 MSAs, and remained unchanged in 5 MSAs. On average, MSA personal income rose 4.2 percent in 2012, after growing 6.0 percent in 2011. Personal income growth ranged from 12.1 percent in Midland, TX, to –1.6 percent in Yuma, AZ, one of only five MSAs where personal income declined in 2012. Inflation, as measured by the national price index for personal consumption expenditures, slowed to 1.8 percent in 2012 from 2.4 percent in 2011.

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For more on local area personal income, read the full report.

State Personal Income: Second Quarter 2013

spi_0930_1State personal incomes grew 1.0 percent on average in the second quarter of 2013 after falling 1.3 percent in the first quarter. Personal income growth ranged from 1.5 percent in Florida and Arizona spi_0913_2to –0.7 percent in Nebraska. The national price index for personal consumption expenditures was unchanged in the second quarter after rising 0.3 percent in the first quarter.

For more information on state personal income, see the full report.

Economic Growth Widespread Across Metropolitan Areas in 2012

• Metropolitan areas accounted for nearly 91 percent of national current-dollar gross domestic product (GDP). The ten largest metropolitan areas accounted for 34 percent of national GDP in 2012, while the smallest 79 metropolitan areas accounted for less than 2 percent of national GDP.0917blog

• Real GDP grew in 305 metropolitan areas. Durable-goods manufacturing, trade, and financial activities led growth in 2012. Durable-goods manufacturing and financial activities contributed more than 50 percent to real GDP growth in 80 and 53 metropolitan areas, respectively.

• Trade contributed to real GDP growth in 363 metropolitan areas. Growth was strongest for metropolitan areas in the Southwest regions such as Odessa, TX.

• Financial activities contributed more than 2 percentage points to overall growth in real GDP in Missoula, MT; Eau Claire, WI; Bloomington, IL; Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI; and Ocean City, NJ.

• In 2012, San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA was the fastest growing metropolitan area (7.4 percent) among economies with real GDP of more than $100 billion. Midland, TX, grew the fastest (14.4 percent) of the metro areas with real GDP of $10–100 billion. Odessa, TX, grew the fastest (14.1 percent) of the metro areas with real GDP of less than $10 billion.

For more information on GDP by metropolitan area, read the full report.