Archive for the 'Survey of Current Business' Category

Activities of U.S. Affiliates of Foreign Multinational Enterprises in 2012

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) has released preliminary statistics on the activities of U.S. affiliates of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) in 2012. These statistics are based on the results of the 2012 Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States (“inward” direct investment.)

These statistics cover the finances and operations of U.S. affiliates of foreign MNEs—including balance sheet and income statement details, employment and employee compensation, capital expenditures, trade in goods, and expenditures for research and development.

The activities of majority-owned U.S. affiliates are featured in the statistics. Less detailed statistics are also presented for all U.S. affiliates (both majority owned and minority owned). BEA also produces statistics that cover the domestic and foreign activities of U.S. MNEs, that is enterprises involved in “outward”  direct  investment. Jointly,  these statistics and the statistics on the activities of U.S. affiliates are referred to as statistics on the activities of multinational enterprises (AMNEs).

The current-dollar value added of majority-owned U.S. affiliates, a measure of their contribution to U.S. gross domestic product, totaled  $773.8 billion in 2012. Current-dollar value added rose 3.7 percent in 2012, following larger increases in 2010 and 2011, but it grew less rapidly than the value added of all U.S. private industry in 2012. As a result, affiliates’ share of U.S. private industry value added decreased from  6.2  percent in  2011 to  6.1  percent in 2012. Majority-owned U.S. affiliates employed 5.8 million workers in 2012, an increase of 1.3 percent, following  larger increases in 2010 and 2011. The share of U.S. private industry employment accounted for by these affiliates was 5.0 percent, down from 5.1 percent in 2011.

Some additional highlights of the statistics on majority-owned U.S. affiliates for 2012:

  • As in previous years, affiliates with ultimate beneficial  owners  (UBO)  in  seven  countries—Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Japan—accounted for nearly three-fourths of the value added by all majority-owned U.S. affiliates.
  • Exports of goods by affiliates rose 5 percent.
  • Imports of goods by affiliates rose 4 percent. About 60 percent of the goods imported by affiliates were intended for resale without further processing.
  • Research and development (R&D) performed by affiliates rose 6 percent.

For more information, read the full article in the November Survey of Current Business.  Click here for all the data tables.

Detailed Statistics on Trade in Services Coming Soon

With the release of the October edition of the Survey of Current Business, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) will publish the most detailed tables on trade in services by type of service and by area and country. These data represent the final product related to the restructuring of BEA’s international accounts, the most sweeping revamp since 1976.

This annual article (U.S. International Services: Trade in Services and Services Supplied Through Affiliates) provides a broad perspective on services provided by and to the United States in international markets by presenting information on both trade in services and services supplied through the channel of direct investment by affiliates of multinational enterprises. This year’s article will feature restructured tables on U.S. exports and imports of services consistent with those released with the international transactions accounts in June. The statistics on services supplied through affiliates will not be restructured but there will be minor changes to the tables to adopt new terminology.

In addition, these tables will be made available for the first time in BEA’s interactive tables.  This gives users the flexibility to customize their own time series rather than relying on static Excel tables. Templates previewing the structure of the tables are available here.

New information on trade by detailed type of service and by area and country will be available under the restructured trade in services tables.  For example:
• Exports and imports of accounting, auditing, and bookkeeping services by area and country
• Exports and imports of construction by area and country
• Exports and imports of architectural and engineering services by area and country

Also, the analysis in the article has expanded to include statistics on services provided to, and received from, nonresidents by U.S. government agencies, both military and nonmilitary, as part of a new category, “government goods and services n.i.e.” (not included elsewhere).  With this change, this article will now provide detailed information on all U.S. trade in services, not just private services.

These changes have aligned U.S. data more closely with updated international guidelines, such as the sixth edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual. Keeping up with international guidelines makes it easier for users to compare U.S. data with data from our major trade and investment partners.

BEA’s Industry Economic Accounts to Hit Major Milestone

Roughly every 5 years, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) releases comprehensive revisions of its major economic accounts. These revisions are generally more detailed than annual revisions, implementing changes in methods, statistics and definitions to better reflect an ever-evolving economy. In December, BEA will release the 2013 comprehensive revision of the Industry Economic Accounts (IEAs), which includes two main sets of statistics, the annual industry accounts and the benchmark input-output (I-O) accounts. That will follow the release in July of a comprehensive revision of the National Income and Product Accounts (NIPAs), or GDP accounts.

The upcoming comprehensive IEA revision will mark a significant milestone: the full integration of the IEAs with the NIPAs, which was first suggested in a March 2004 article in the Survey of Current Business and later amplified in other articles. This enhanced integration, which has long been recommended by economists, will allow for a higher degree of consistency among these widely followed accounts, offering a more consistent view of industry dynamics within the overall economy.

A preview of the 2013 comprehensive revision of the IEAs was published in the June 2013 issue of the Survey.