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Widespread Industry Growth Drives Upturn in GDP in Second Quarter

Widespread industry growth drove the U.S. economy’s second-quarter rebound, with 19 of the 22 industry groups tracked contributing 6.7 percentage points to real Gross Domestic Product. Finance, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing; manufacturing; and agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting led the way.

Real GDP increased 4.6 percent in the second quarter, after decreasing 2.1 percent in the first quarter.

Real Value Added by Industry

Real value added —a measure of an industry’s contribution to GDP—for finance, insurance, real estate, rental, and leasing increased 2.7 percent in the second quarter, after decreasing 4.1 percent in the first

quarter. The upturn was primarily concentrated in the finance and insurance sector, which includes banking, brokerage and other types of financial services.  Real gross output for the finance and insurance sector – a measure of an industry’s sales or receipts adjusted for inflation – increased 2.7 percent in the second quarter, after increasing 2.3 percent.

Real value added for the manufacturing sector also turned up, increasing 6.8 percent, after decreasing 1.3 percent in the first quarter. Durable-goods manufacturing, which includes motor vehicle manufacturing and computer and electronic product manufacturing, led the overall upturn in manufacturing, increasing 8 percent in the second quarter, after decreasing 4.5 percent.  Similarly, real gross output for durable-goods manufacturing increased 7.3 percent, after decreasing 2.7 percent in the first quarter.

Real value added for the agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting sector increased 14.2 percent.  The sector’s real gross output also rebounded in the second quarter, increasing 6.3 percent, after falling 19.9 percent.

Quarterly GDP by industry statistics, including value added, gross output, and intermediate inputs, can be accessed in BEA’s Interactive Data Application at www.bea.gov/itable/.

Widespread Growth Across Industries in Second Quarter 2014

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 4.6 percent in the second quarter of 2014, after decreasing 2.1 percent in the first quarter. Both private goods- and services-producing industries contributed to the increase, while the government sector decreased.

  • The leading contributors to the increase were durable-good manufacturing; finance and insurance; and retail trade.

Real GDP and Real Value added by sector

  • Durable-goods manufacturing real value added increased 8.0 percent in the second quarter, after decreasing 4.5 percent.
  • Finance and insurance increased 6.0 percent, after decreasing 9.8 percent.
  • Retail trade increased 7.2, after increasing 4.3 percent.

Read GDP percent change

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September 2014 Trade Gap is $43.0 Billion

The U.S. monthly international trade deficit increased in September 2014 according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau. The deficit increased from $40.0 billion in August (revised) to $43.0 billion in September, mainly reflecting a decrease in exports. The previously published August deficit was $40.1 billion. The goods deficit increased $2.4 billion from August to $62.7 billion in September; the services surplus decreased $0.6 billion from August to $19.6 billion in September.

balance on Goods and Services
Exports

Exports of goods and services decreased $3.0 billion in September to $195.6 billion, mostly reflecting a decrease in exports of goods. Exports of services also decreased.

  • The decrease in exports of goods was more than accounted for by decreases in industrial supplies and materials, in capital goods, and in consumer goods. An increase in foods, feeds, and beverages was partly offsetting.
  • The decrease in exports of services mostly reflected decreases in travel (for all purposes including education) and in transport, which includes freight and port services and passenger fares. Changes in the other categories of services exports were relatively small and nearly offsetting.

Imports
Imports of goods and services increased $0.1 billion in September to $238.6 billion, reflecting an increase in imports of services. Imports of goods decreased.

  • The increase in imports of services mostly reflected an increase in transport. Changes in the other categories of services imports were relatively small.
  • The decrease in imports of goods was more than accounted for by decreases in industrial supplies and materials, in capital goods, and in automotive vehicles, parts, and engines. An increase in consumer goods was partly offsetting.

Goods by geographic area (seasonally adjusted, Census basis)

  • The goods deficit with China increased from $28.5 billion in August to $31.2 billion in September. Exports decreased $0.1 billion to $9.8, and imports increased $2.6 billion to $41.0 billion.
  • The goods deficit with Canada increased from $2.7 billion in August to $4.0 billion in September. Exports decreased $0.6 billion to $26.3 billion, and imports increased $0.7 billion to $30.3 billion.
  • The goods deficit with Germany decreased from &7.2 billion in August to $6.2 billion in September. Exports increased $0.1 billion to $4.2 billion, and imports decreased $0.8 billion to $10.4 billion.

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