Posts Tagged 'Bureau of Economic Analyis'

Widespread Growth Across Industries Continues in Third Quarter 2014

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 5.0 percent in the third quarter of 2014, reflecting positive contributions from 20 of 22 industry groups. The private goods- and services-producing industries, as well as the government sector, contributed to the increase.

  • The leading contributors to the increase were finance and insurance; mining; and real estate and rental and leasing.

Real Value Added by Sector Jan22

  • Finance and insurance real value added increased 21.2 percent in the third quarter, after increasing 6.0 percent.
  • Mining increased 25.6 percent, after increasing 11.5 percent.
  • Real estate and rental and leasing increased 4.4 percent, after increasing 0.9 percent.

Real Value Added by Industry Jan22

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November 2014 Trade Gap is $39.0 Billion

The U.S. monthly international trade deficit decreased in November 2014 according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the U.S. Census Bureau. The deficit decreased from $42.2 billion in October (revised) to $39.0 billion in November, as imports decreased more than exports. The previously published October deficit was $43.4 billion. The goods deficit decreased $3.3 billion from October to $58.3 billion in November. The services surplus decreased $0.1 billion from October to $19.3 billion in November.

Balance on Goods and Services Trade Jan7

Exports
Exports of goods and services decreased $2.0 billion in November to $196.4 billion, mostly reflecting a decrease in exports of goods. Exports of services also decreased.

  • The decrease in exports of goods was more than accounted for by a decrease in capital goods. An increase in industrial supplies and materials was partly offsetting.
  • The decrease in exports of services mostly reflected a decrease in transport, which includes freight and port services and passenger fares.

Imports
Imports of goods and services decreased $5.2 billion in November to $235.4 billion, reflecting a decrease in imports of goods. Imports of services were nearly unchanged.

  • The decrease in imports of goods mostly reflected a decrease in industrial supplies and materials.
  • Imports of services were nearly unchanged as a decrease in travel (for all purposes including education) was mostly offset by small increases in several other categories.

Goods by geographic area (seasonally adjusted, Census basis)

  • The goods deficit with Canada decreased from $2.7 billion in October (revised) to $1.4 billion in November. Exports were nearly unchanged at $26.7 billion and imports decreased $1.3 billion to $28.1 billion
  • The goods surplus with South and Central America increased from $2.3 billion in October to $4.3 billion in November. Exports increased $0.5 billion to $15.5 billion and imports decreased $1.5 billion to $11.2 billion.
  • The goods deficit with the European Union increased from $11.2 billion in October to $12.7 billion in November. Exports decreased $0.7 billion to $22.2 billion and imports increased $0.8 billion to $35.0 billion.

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BEA Operational Improvements Enable Agency to Publish More Regional Economic Statistics

Operational improvements at the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) mean the public will soon get to see more regional economic data. These improvements will safeguard businesses’ private information, while ensuring vital regional data is available to policy makers and other data users. BEA is constantly looking at ways to better provide the information that users need while protecting the confidentiality of employers’ records.

One improvement is in the area of county-level earnings. BEA, for instance, produces statistics on how much people earn in different industries for individual counties.  If there are too few employers in an industry for a given county, in order to protect employers’ privacy, BEA cannot publicly publish the data for that industry. The BEA county-level earnings by industry data are then used to calculate BEA’s gross domestic product by metropolitan area statistics. If BEA can’t publicly use certain pieces of data for an industry in the county-level earnings data set, then BEA also might not be able to publish the same data for that industry in our gross domestic product by metropolitan area statistics.

Since the 1980s, BEA has relied on a set of computer programs to identify which statistics must not be published publicly to protect the confidentiality of business records for individual companies.  This year, however, BEA is switching to a new disclosure-avoidance system that reduces processing time from five days to one, while generating fewer non-public statistics.

Our testing indicates that the new system will consistently result in 33 percent fewer unpublished values in the final public statistics on the economic activity generated by metropolitan areas.

Another improvement will affect data on how much each industry contributes to economic activity in   metro areas. Because of this improvement, BEA will increase the number of data points on industry contributions to metro area economic activity that can be published from 68.3 percent to 93.3 percent, meaning that BEA will be able to publish many more pieces of data.

These advancements are examples of how BEA delivers strong customer service through operational excellence. BEA is working harder and smarter to respond to our customers’ needs.  The Commerce Department identifies operational excellence as an important pillar in its Open for Business Agenda. That is, delivering better services, solutions and outcomes that benefit the American people.

BEA prides itself on producing timely, relevant and accurate statistics and putting its innovative thinking to work to meet both economic measurement challenges and customers’ needs.