Posts Tagged 'exports'

New Data Tool Provides Fast Access to Trade and Investment Stats for Countries

The Bureau of Economic Analysis launched today a new data tool on its website that gives users a snapshot of statistics on trade and investment between the United States and another country by simply clicking on a world map.

These fast facts at your fingertips can include:

  • Total exports, imports and trade balance between the United States and the country you select.
  • The top five categories of goods and services the United States buys from and sells to that country.
  • Country level data on U.S. direct investment abroad and foreign direct investment in the United States and on the activities of multinational enterprises such as employment and sales.

The country snapshots, or factsheets, also contain charts and can be printed or downloaded to a spreadsheet. The new data tool pulls statistics from BEA’s international data sets on exports, imports, direct investment, and the activities of multinational enterprises into a single easy-to-digest resource. Similar to the BEA’s BEARFACTS regional factsheets for state and regional economic data, the new international factsheets can be used to quickly get up to speed for a business presentation, a news story, or a school research project.

Users select a country from an interactive world map or a searchable menu of countries. The tool generates a country factsheet with graphs and tables showing the latest data on U.S. trade and investment with that country. A PDF of the factsheet is available for easy printing. The tool also provides data tables containing more detailed statistics that can be downloaded in Excel format.

To access the new international data tool, visit http://bea.gov/international/factsheet/.

Detailed Statistics on Trade in Services Coming Soon

With the release of the October edition of the Survey of Current Business, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) will publish the most detailed tables on trade in services by type of service and by area and country. These data represent the final product related to the restructuring of BEA’s international accounts, the most sweeping revamp since 1976.

This annual article (U.S. International Services: Trade in Services and Services Supplied Through Affiliates) provides a broad perspective on services provided by and to the United States in international markets by presenting information on both trade in services and services supplied through the channel of direct investment by affiliates of multinational enterprises. This year’s article will feature restructured tables on U.S. exports and imports of services consistent with those released with the international transactions accounts in June. The statistics on services supplied through affiliates will not be restructured but there will be minor changes to the tables to adopt new terminology.

In addition, these tables will be made available for the first time in BEA’s interactive tables.  This gives users the flexibility to customize their own time series rather than relying on static Excel tables. Templates previewing the structure of the tables are available here.

New information on trade by detailed type of service and by area and country will be available under the restructured trade in services tables.  For example:
• Exports and imports of accounting, auditing, and bookkeeping services by area and country
• Exports and imports of construction by area and country
• Exports and imports of architectural and engineering services by area and country

Also, the analysis in the article has expanded to include statistics on services provided to, and received from, nonresidents by U.S. government agencies, both military and nonmilitary, as part of a new category, “government goods and services n.i.e.” (not included elsewhere).  With this change, this article will now provide detailed information on all U.S. trade in services, not just private services.

These changes have aligned U.S. data more closely with updated international guidelines, such as the sixth edition of the Balance of Payments and International Investment Position Manual. Keeping up with international guidelines makes it easier for users to compare U.S. data with data from our major trade and investment partners.