Posts Tagged 'survey of current business'

How Do Corporate Inversions Affect the International and National Economic Accounts?

Recently, a growing number of articles in the media have noted U.S. corporations announcing that they intend to move their headquarters overseas.  This practice is known as a corporate inversion, which occurs when a U.S. corporation that is currently the ultimate owner of its worldwide operations takes steps to become a wholly owned subsidiary of a foreign corporation.

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) has published a BEA Briefing in the Survey of Current Business that discusses how corporate inversions can affect major aggregates in the international and national economic accounts, including an estimate of the size of the impact of inversions on related BEA statistics.

Below are some highlights from the Briefing. For the full analysis and to view the impact of inversions on activities of multinational enterprises (AMNE) statistics see the BEA Briefing.

International Statistics

  • The foreign direct investment position in the United States—which comprises the direct investors’ equity in, and net outstanding loans to, their U.S. affiliates—generally increases after an inversion because the inverting U.S. corporation becomes an asset of a foreign investor.
  • The measures of multinational enterprise activities—which include data items such as employment, capital expenditures, value added, and research and development (R&D) expenditures—also generally increase as a result of inversions.
  • Corporate inversions may also affect BEA’s U.S. direct investment abroad, or outward direct investment, statistics if the U.S. multinational enterprise transfers the ownership of some or all of its foreign affiliates to its new foreign owner.

National Statistics

  • Corporate inversions would generally reduce gross national income, that is, income resulting from the current production of goods and services by U.S.-owned labor and capital.
  • Corporate profits, the portion of the total gross national income earned from current production that is accounted for by U.S. corporations, would also generally be reduced by inversions.

Gross domestic income, which is income resulting from the current production of goods and services in the domestic economy, would not be affected by inversions.

New Health Care Statistics to be Released Jan. 22

New statistics tracking the changes in the prices to treat different diseases are slated to be available Thursday, Jan. 22 when the Bureau of Economic Analysis publishes a new health care satellite account report.

The statistics – the first of their kind – provide information about the changes in prices to treat different diseases – illustrating trends in prices over time. The statistics cover 2000-2010 and will be contained in a report published in the January Survey of Current Business. Another new set of annual statistics that track how much is spent to treat different diseases over that same 10-year period also will be released. These new statistics are derived from large medical claims databases that include millions of individuals and billions of claims.

BEA’s new detailed, health care statistics will provide businesses, households and policymakers with even more data to make informed decisions.

These new health care statistics emerge from a multiyear project to improve the way health care spending is measured throughout the U.S. economy. Health care spending is an important part of the U.S. economy, accounting for 17.4 percent of Gross Domestic Product in 2013, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Activities of U.S. Affiliates of Foreign Multinational Enterprises in 2012

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) has released preliminary statistics on the activities of U.S. affiliates of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) in 2012. These statistics are based on the results of the 2012 Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States (“inward” direct investment.)

These statistics cover the finances and operations of U.S. affiliates of foreign MNEs—including balance sheet and income statement details, employment and employee compensation, capital expenditures, trade in goods, and expenditures for research and development.

The activities of majority-owned U.S. affiliates are featured in the statistics. Less detailed statistics are also presented for all U.S. affiliates (both majority owned and minority owned). BEA also produces statistics that cover the domestic and foreign activities of U.S. MNEs, that is enterprises involved in “outward”  direct  investment. Jointly,  these statistics and the statistics on the activities of U.S. affiliates are referred to as statistics on the activities of multinational enterprises (AMNEs).

The current-dollar value added of majority-owned U.S. affiliates, a measure of their contribution to U.S. gross domestic product, totaled  $773.8 billion in 2012. Current-dollar value added rose 3.7 percent in 2012, following larger increases in 2010 and 2011, but it grew less rapidly than the value added of all U.S. private industry in 2012. As a result, affiliates’ share of U.S. private industry value added decreased from  6.2  percent in  2011 to  6.1  percent in 2012. Majority-owned U.S. affiliates employed 5.8 million workers in 2012, an increase of 1.3 percent, following  larger increases in 2010 and 2011. The share of U.S. private industry employment accounted for by these affiliates was 5.0 percent, down from 5.1 percent in 2011.

Some additional highlights of the statistics on majority-owned U.S. affiliates for 2012:

  • As in previous years, affiliates with ultimate beneficial  owners  (UBO)  in  seven  countries—Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and Japan—accounted for nearly three-fourths of the value added by all majority-owned U.S. affiliates.
  • Exports of goods by affiliates rose 5 percent.
  • Imports of goods by affiliates rose 4 percent. About 60 percent of the goods imported by affiliates were intended for resale without further processing.
  • Research and development (R&D) performed by affiliates rose 6 percent.

For more information, read the full article in the November Survey of Current Business.  Click here for all the data tables.