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Travel and Tourism Spending Turned Up in the First Quarter

Real spending (output) on travel and tourism turned up in the first quarter of 2017, increasing at an annual rate of 0.4 percent after decreasing 2.7 percent (revised) in the fourth quarter of 2016, according to new statistics released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In contrast, real gross domestic product (GDP) for the nation decelerated, increasing 1.2 percent in the first quarter (second estimate) after increasing 2.1 percent in the fourth quarter of 2016.

The leading contributors to the upturn in real spending were traveler accommodations and passenger air transportation. Traveler accommodations turned up, increasing 5.3 percent after decreasing 5.9 percent (revised) in the fourth quarter of 2016. The upturn also reflects a smaller decline in passenger air transportation, which decreased 6.0 percent in the first quarter after declining 14.4 percent (revised) in the fourth quarter.

tour117_chart1

Tourism Prices. Prices for travel and tourism goods and services decelerated in the first quarter of 2017, increasing 3.2 percent following an increase of 9.4 percent (revised) in the fourth quarter of 2016. The deceleration was attributable to prices for traveler accommodations, all other transportation-related goods and services, and passenger air transportation.

  • Prices for traveler accommodations turned down, decreasing 2.1 percent after increasing 10.6 percent (revised) in the fourth quarter of 2016.
  • Prices for all other transportation-related goods and services, which includes gasoline, increased 7.0 percent in the first quarter after increasing 16.8 percent (revised) in the previous quarter.
  • Prices for passenger air transportation decelerated, increasing 6.3 percent in the first quarter after increasing 17.8 percent (revised).

tour117_chart2

For more information, read the full report.

Real Personal Income for Metropolitan Areas, 2015

Growth of real personal income for metropolitan areas — an area’s current-dollar personal income adjusted by itsregional price parity (RPP) and the national personal consumption expenditure (PCE) price index — ranged from -10.1 percent in Midland, TX to 9.9 percent in Carson City, NV.metro personal income

  • Large metropolitan areas — those with population greater than two million — with the fastest growth in real personal income were San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA (7.4 percent), Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL (6.5 percent), Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA (6.4 percent), and Sacramento–Roseville–Arden-Arcade, CA (6.4 percent).
  •  Large metropolitan areas with the slowest growth in real personal income were ClevelandElyria, OH (2.8 percent), Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO (2.8 percent), and Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (3.0 percent).
  • Large metropolitan areas with the highest all items RPP were New York-Newark-Jersey City, NYNJ-PA (121.9), San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA (121.9), and Washington-ArlingtonAlexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV, (119.1).
  • Large metropolitan areas with the lowest all items RPP were Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (89.2), Cleveland-Elyria, OH (89.7), and St. Louis, MO-IL (90.6).
  • Across large metropolitan areas, San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA had the highest rents RPP (186.0) and Cleveland-Elyria, OH had the lowest (78.7).

For more information, read the full report.

Real Personal Income for States, 2015

Growth of real state personal income — a state’s current-dollar personal income adjusted by the state’s regional price parity (RPP) and the national personal consumption expenditure (PCE) price index — ranged from -2.3 percent in North Dakota to 7.0 percent in Delaware.

Real Personal Income for States June 2217

  •  States with the fastest growth in real personal income were Delaware (7.0 percent), Oregon (6.1 percent), and California (6.1 percent). The District of Columbia’s real personal income grew 6.6 percent.
  • The only state with declining real personal income was North Dakota (-2.3 percent). States with the slowest growth in real personal income were Wyoming (0.5 percent), Nebraska (0.7 percent), and Oklahoma (1.3 percent).
  • States with the highest all items RPPs were Hawaii (118.8), New York (115.3), New Jersey (113.4), and California (113.4). The District of Columbia’s RPP was 117.0.
  • States with the lowest all items RPPs were Mississippi (86.2), Alabama (86.8), and Arkansas (87.4).
  • Across states, Hawaii had the highest rents RPP (163.4) and Alabama had the lowest (62.8).

For more information, read the full report.


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